North View Gallery Residency: August 8-31 2017
Exhibition: August 30-October 21

Artist talk and Closing Reception: Thursday, October 19 2-5pm

Guest Curator: Kristine Olson

Old Powerhouse is an experimental artwork that centers upon two architectural forms: the pyramids of Ancient Egypt, and an electrical powerhouse located on the University of British Columbia campus. In the artwork they are both encountered as monumental projections of history, and used to question the invisible forces that shape the production of the tale of western civilization. Rather than traditional narrative form, the work proposes an alternative historical model; an abstract dialogue describing massive energies, condense and diffuse.

Composed of a large pyramidical form, an animation which uses the chaotic logic of the internet, and steam, the work brings a dynamic questioning to the processes within the gallery — are they enacting the slow deterioration of a ruin, or the messy first stirrings of life? It is an embodiment of our own strange historical moment; old gods of energy and light groaning, perched between giving life and destroying it.

Michelle Weinstein

With collaborative assistance from: Andrzej Bochnacki, Eric Angus, Daniel Phillips

And a special thanks to: Josephine Hass, Henry John, Chris Mills, Shannen Muhl, Jag Sharma, James Torcov, the employees and engineers of the UBC Powerhouse.

North View Gallery
Portland Community College
12000 49th Avenue, Portland OR
Communications Technology Bldg.
8-4 PM Mon-Fri, 11-4 PM Sat

Contact:
Mark R. Smith
North View Gallery Director
Email: msmith@pcc.edu
Tel: 971 722 8085

Photo credit for "Old Powerhouse" installation images: Anna Olson

The single channel video is embedded in the central portion of the structure. The viewer looks down into the rectangular cabinet-like construction in order to watch the video. A puff of steam is periodically emitted from the bottom of the structure, creating a wall of fog between the viewer of the video and the entry to the gallery. The steam rises, engulfs the entire structure, then quickly dissolves.

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